Department of Mathematics & Computer Science

 

 


 

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers courses of study leading to the Bachelor of Science degree with majors in mathematics, mathematics leading to a secondary education certification, computer science, and computer information systems. The department offers dual degree programs in mathematics/engineering. Students may also choose a minor in mathematics, computer science, computer information systems, or new media design and communication.
 

MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS 


Core Curriculum Requirements - 60 hours
All baccalaureate degree programs at NGCSU have as a requirement the satisfactory completion of at least 60 semester credit hours comprising the six areas of the core curriculum. A complete description of Areas A-E of the core curriculum can be found on page 86. Individual degree programs may specify exceptions and/or particular courses which must be taken within each Area A-E of the core curriculum. Those exceptions and/or course requirements, and Area F of the core curriculum are shown below.

Area A MATH 1113 or MATH 2450
Area B no exceptions
Area C no exceptions
Area D MATH 2450 or MATH 2460
Area E no exceptions

Area F. Courses Appropriate to Major Field - 18 hours
MATH 2460 (if not taken in Area D) - 4 hours
Note: MATH 2400 may be taken in Area F when 2460 is taken in Area D.
MATH 2470 - 4 hours
MATH 2800 - 3 hours
Foreign Language I or II - 3 hours
CSCI 1301 - 3 hours
Carry over from A & D - 1 or 2 hours

REQUIRED FOR MATHEMATICS MAJORS (28 CREDIT HOURS)
MATH 3000, 3600, 3650, 4200, 4950, either MATH 3350 or 4180 and an additional 12 hours
of 3000 or 4000 level Mathematics courses that do not include MATH 3100, 3110, 3116, or 3140

OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
Foreign Language II (if not taken in Area F)
Senior Exit Exam and Exit Questionnaire
Regents' Skils Test or exemption (see page 79-80)

Minor : 15-18 hours
Electives to bring the total number of hours to 120, and the total number of upper level hours to 40. These totals do not include the basic Physical Education requirement
Military Science requirement (for military students)
U.S. and Georgia Constitution and History requirement

No mathematics courses with a grade of D will be allowed in an official program of study.
Basic Physical Education Requirement - 3 hours
 

MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS - SECONDARY EDUCATION
(Admission to Teacher Education Program required.
See page 331 for admissions requirements.)
 

Core Curriculum Requirements - 60 hours
All baccalaureate degree programs at NGCSU have as a requirement the satisfactory completion of at least 60 semester credit hours comprising the six areas of the Core Curriculum. A complete description of Areas A-E of the core curriculum can be found on page 86. Individual degree programs may specify exceptions and/or particular courses which must be taken within each Area A-E of the core curriculum. Those exceptions and/or course requirements, and Area F of the core curriculum are shown below.

Area A MATH 1113 or MATH 2450
Area B no exceptions
Area C no exceptions
Area D MATH 2450 or MATH 2460
Area E no exceptions

Area F. Courses Appropriate to Major Field - 18 hours
MATH 2460 (If not taken in Area D) 4 hours
Note: MATH 2400 may be taken in Area F when 2460 is taken in Area D.
MATH 2470 - 4 hours
MATH 2800 - 3 hours
EDUC 2001 - 3 hours
EDUC 2002 - 3 hours
PSYC 2103 - 3 hours
Carryover from A or D - 1 or 2 hours

REQUIRED FOR MATHEMATICS - SECONDARY EDUCATION MAJORS
(29 CREDIT HOURS)
CSCI 1301, 2100; MATH 3000, 3120, 3350, 3600, 3650, and an additional 9 hours of 3000 or 4000 level Mathematics courses that do not include MATH 3100, 3110, 3116, or 3150

EDUCATION COMPONENT (30 CREDIT HOURS)
CSCI 1200, EDUC 3002, 3003, 4000, MAED 4101, MAED 4201, EDUC 3540, EDUC 4103, 4104 and 4105

OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Foreign Language II
Maintain an overall grade point average of 2.75
Electives to bring the total number of hours to 120, exclusive of the Basic Physical Education Requirement
Military Science requirement (for military students)
U.S. & Georgia Constitution and History requirement
Senior Exit Exam and Exit Questionnaire

Regents' Skills Test or exemption (see page 77)

No mathematics courses with a grade of D will be allowed in an official program of study.

In addition to the criteria required of all students admitted to the Teacher Education Program, a student seeking entrance to the major in Mathematics - Secondary Education must have completed Math 2460 with a grade of C or better.
Basic Physical Education Requirement
 

MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
 

Core Curriculum Requirements - 60 hours
All baccalaureate degree programs at NGCSU have as requirements the satisfactory completion of at least 60 semester credit hours comprising the six areas of the core curriculum. A complete description of Areas A-E of the core curriculum can be found on page 84. Individual degree programs may specify exceptions and/or particular courses which must be taken within each Area A-E of the core curriculum. Those exceptions and/or course requirements, and Area F of the core curriculum are shown below.

Area A MATH 1113 or MATH 2450
Area B no exceptions
Area C no exceptions
Area D MATH 2450 or MATH 2400
Area E no exceptions

Area F. Courses Appropriate to Major Field - 18 hours
CSCI 1301 - 3 hours
CSCI 1301L - 1 hour
CSCI 1302 - 4 hours
CSCI 2150 - 3 hours
CSCI 2700 - 3 hours
MATH 2450 or 2400 - 3 or 4 hours
Carry over from A or D - 1 hour

REQUIRED FOR COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJORS (33 CREDIT HOURS)
CSCI 3100, 3200, 3300, 4100, 4200, 4400, 4950 and 12 hours of 3000 or 4000 level Computer Science courses that do not include 3810, 4000 or 4510

OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Foreign Language II
MATH 3500 and MATH 2460
Senior Exit Exam and Exit Questionnaire
Regents' Test or exemption (see page 79-80)

Minor: 15-18 hours
Electives to bring the total number of hours to 120, exclusive of the Basic Physical Education requirement.
Military Science Requirement (for military students)
U.S. and Georgia Constitution and History requirement
No computer science courses with a grade of D will be allowed in an official program of study.
Basic Physical Education Requirement. - 3 hours
 

CS and CIS majors may declare a concentration in Information Assurance and Security (IAS). The required courses for the concentration are the following four electives:
CSCI 3050 Introduction to Information Security
CSCI 3250 Computer Security
CSCI 3350 Computer Forensics
CSCI 4650 Network Security
 

MAJOR IN COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

Core Curriculum Requirements - 60 hours
All baccalaureate degree programs at NGCSU have as requirements the satisfactory completion of at least 60 semester credit hours comprising the six areas of the core curriculum. A complete description of Areas A-E of the core curriculum can be found on page 86. Individual degree programs may specify exceptions and/or particular courses which must be taken within each Area A-E of the core curriculum. Those exceptions and/or course requirements, and Area F of the core curriculum are shown below.

Area A MATH 1113 or MATH 2450
Area B no exceptions
Area C no exceptions
Area D MATH 2450 or MATH 2400
Area E no exceptions

Area F. Courses Appropriate to Major Field - 18 hours
CSCI 1301 - 3 hours
CSCI 1301L - 1 hour
CSCI 1302 - 4 hours
CSCI 2150 - 3 hours
CSCI 2700 - 3 hours
MATH 2450 or MATH 2400 - 3 or 4 hours
Carry over from A or D - 0-2 hours

REQUIRED FOR COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS MAJORS (30 CREDIT HOURS)
CSCI 3300, 3400, 3500, 4500, 4910, 4950 and 12 hours selected from ACCT 4330 and 3000 or 4000 level Computer Science courses that do not include 3810, 4510 or 4000

BADM minor - see page 114.

OTHER REQUIREMENTS
Foreign Language II (can be counted in Area F if need be)
Electives to bring the total number of hours to 120, exclusive of Basic Physical Education Requirement.
Military Science requirement (for military students)
U.S. and Georgia Constitution and History requirement
No computer science courses with a grade of D will be allowed in an official program of study.
Basic Physical Education requirement - 3 hours
Senior Exit Exam and Exit Questionnaire
Regents' Skills Test or exemption (see page 79-80)
 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Dual Degree Programs are offered in Mathematics/Engineering with Clemson University and Georgia Tech. Students are provided the opportunity to attend NGCSU for approximately three years before embarking on professional academic work at Georgia Tech or Clemson. After completing the academic requirements of both institutions, the student receives a bachelor's degree in mathematics from NGCSU and a bachelor's degree in a chosen engineering field from the second institution.

Dual Degree Requirements: 

  1. Complete the course work at NGCSU as outlined.
  2. Obtain a recommendation from the Dual Degree coordinator at NGCSU.
  3. Maintain a grade point average and achieve the specified test results which would indicate that the student could satisfactorily complete the degree requirements at the second institution.
  4. Complete a program at the second institution-the number of hours of which equals the number of credit hours required of juniors and seniors enrolled in the standard curriculum for the degree being sought.
  5. If the official study program at the second institution includes electives and the candidate has excessive hours at NGCSU, he/she may petition that these excess hours be used as transfer credits. Such transfer credits shall not amount to more than one half of the official study program at the second institution.

DUAL DEGREE - MATHEMATICS/ENGINEERING
 

Core Curriculum Requirements - 60 hours
All baccalaureate degree programs at NGCSU have as a requirement the satisfactory completion of at least 60 semester credit hours comprising the six areas of the core curriculum. A complete description of Areas A-E of the core curriculum can be found on page 86. Individual degree programs may specify exceptions and/or particular courses which must be taken within each Area A-E of the core curriculum. Those exceptions and/or course requirements, and Area F of the core curriculum are shown below.

Area A MATH 1113 or MATH 2450
Area B no exceptions
Area C no exceptions
Area D MATH 2450 or MATH 2460
Area E no exceptions

Area F. Courses Appropriate to Major Field - 18 hours
MATH 2460 (If not taken in Area D) 4 hours
Note: MATH 2800 may be taken in Area F when 2460 is taken in Area D
MATH 2470 - 4 hours
PHYS 2211 - 3 hours
PHYS 2212 - 3 hours
CSCI 1301 - 3 hours
Carry over from A & D - 1 or 2 hours

ADDITIONAL COURSES AT NGCSU (up to 31 hours)
MATH 2800, 3000, 3600, 3650, 4200, and either MATH 3400 or 4180.
CHEM 1211, 1211L, 1212 & 1212L (if not taken in area D)
PHYS 2211L and PHYS 2212L
PHYS 3111
Basic Physical Education Requirement. - 3 hours
Electives ó to bring the total number of credit hours at NGCSU to 90 hours, exclusive of Basic Physical Education Requirement.

MINORS 

MATHEMATICS - 17 hours
MATH 2450, MATH 2460, and 9 hours of 3000 or 4000 Mathematics level courses that do not include MATH 3100, 3110, 3116, or 3150

COMPUTER SCIENCE - 15 hours
CSCI 1301, CSCI 1302, and 9 hours selected from CSCI 3100, 3150, 3300, 3400, and 4500

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS - 15 hours
CSCI 1301, CSCI 1302, and 9 hours selected from CSCI 3150, 3300, 3400, 3500, and 4500

NEW MEDIA DESIGN & COMMUNICATION - 18 hours
ART 3450, ART 4450, CSCI 1301, CSCI 4000, JOUR 3010, and JOUR 3100
 

COURSES IN MATHEMATICS 

NOTE: The majority of non-Mathematics, non-Computer Science and non-science majors selecting an Area A mathematics course are best served by MATH 1101. Students who have a weak background in algebra are suggested to take MATH 1101 in Area A. Business Administration majors planning to eventually take MATH 2040 Brief Calculus are recommended to take MATH 1111 in Area A.

MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Models - 3 hours
An introduction to mathematical modeling using graphical, numerical, symbolic, and verbal techniques to describe and explore real-world data and phenomena. Emphasis is on the use of elementary functions to investigate and analyze applied problems and questions, supported by the use of appropriate technology, and on effective communication of quantitative concepts and results.

MATH 1111 College Algebra - 3 hours
Topics include real and complex numbers, algebraic and absolute value, equations and inequalities, functions, graphs, polynomial and rational functions, and systems of equations, matrices and determinants.

MATH 1113 Precalculus - 3 hours
An intensive course that focuses on applications of the functions, concepts, and methods necessary for success in calculus. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions, right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric identities and equations, oblique triangles, complex numbers, and parametric equations.

MATH 2040 Brief Calculus - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in Math 1111. This course is intended for non-science majors, with particular emphasis on applications of calculus to business. It will develop familiarity with such concepts as limits, the derivative, the definite integral, the indefinite integral and their applications.

MATH 2400 Elementary Statistics - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Three hours of college mathematics. A student will not be allowed credit for MATH 2400 after completing MATH 3300 with a grade of ďCĒ or above. A noncalculus introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include graphical and numerical methods of describing data, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, the normal distribution and estimation.

MATH 2450 Calculus I - 4 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 1113
An introduction to differential calculus. Topics include limits, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions, applications of derivatives, antidifferentiation, simple differential equations, the area under a curve, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and differentiation and integration of exponential and logarithmic functions.

MATH 2460 Calculus II - 4 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2450
A continuation of Calculus I. Topics include application of definite integrals; derivatives and integrals with inverse trigonometric functions; indeterminate forms and líHopitalís rule; techniques of integration; polar coordinates; infinite sequences and series.

MATH 2470 Calculus III - 4 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2460
A continuation of Calculus II. Topics include functions of several variables; partial differentiation; multiple integrals; vector algebra, lines, planes, and curves in three dimensions; and vector calculus.

MATH 2800 Introduction to Mathematical Proof - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2450
Topics include propositions and their truth values, tautologies, quantifiers, methods of proof, sets, relations, equivalence relations and partitions, functions, and mathematical induction.

MATH 3000 Differential Equations - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2460 An introductory course in ordinary differential equations with emphasis upon linear differential equations of the first and second orders. Topics include solution of second order differential equations by the methods of undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, and Laplace transforms.

MATH 3010 Partial Differential Equations - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2470 and 3000.
Topics include power series method for solving ordinary differential equations, Fourier series and integrals, orthogonal functions and partial differential equations with boundary conditions.

MATH 3020 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2460
Topics include one-dimensional flows and bifurcation, phase portraits, linearization and classification of equilibrium points, limit cycles, chaos, one-dimensional maps, and fractals.

MATH 3100 Number Systems - 3 hours
Credit not applicable toward a mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 2400 and a junior or senior standing. Corequisite for early childhood and middle school majors: PHYS 3000. Topics include problem solving strategies, sets and counting, logic, numeration systems, number systems, number theory, ratio and proportion, and an introduction to plane figures.

MATH 3110 Informal Geometry - 3 hours
Credit not applicable toward a mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 3100. Topics include plane figures, polygons and tessellations, space figures, symmetric figures, systems of measurement, area and perimeter, volume and surface area, congruence and similarity mappings, and topological mappings.

MATH 3116 Modeling in Algebra for Teachers - 3 hours
Credit not applicable toward a mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 3100. This course designed for elementary and middle grades pre-service teachers focuses on variables, expressions, equations, inequalities, systems of equations, matrices, and linear, non-linear, and inverse functions. Emphasis is on problem solving, active learning, appropriate communication, substantive connections, technology utilization, and multiple representations of algebraic structures.

MATH 3120 Geometry - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2800. A background in plane geometry is helpful. Topics include classifications of geometries (Euclidean, Non-Euclidean, and other) and geometry related concepts outside the perspective of other mathematics courses.

MATH 3140 Probability and Statistics for Teachers - 3 hours
Credit not applicable toward a mathematics major or minor. Prerequisite: MATH 3100. This technology-infused course designed for elementary pre-service teachers focuses on making decisions and predictions in the context of solving real- world problems through the process of collecting, representing, processing, summarizing, analyzing, and transforming data.
 

MATH 3350 Probability and Statistics I - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2450. An introductory calculus-based course in probability and statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics and linear regression, basic probability and probability distributions, point estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.

MATH 3450 Probability and Statistics II - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 3350. A continuation of the study of probability and statistics, emphasizing the theory of statistical inference. Topics include two-sample estimation and tests of hypothesis, analysis of variance and randomized block designs, regression analysis, correlation, transformations and multiple regression, and quality control methods.

MATH 3500 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2450. An introductory course in discrete mathematics emphasizing the formulation and solution of problems which are discrete in nature. Topics include logic, sets, relations, combinatorial methods, recurrence relations, graphs and networks, directed graphs, and Boolean algebras.

MATH 3520 Graph Theory - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade C or above in MATH 2460. An introductory course in Graph Theory. Topics include fundamental concepts and definitions, trees, distance, matchings, factors, connectivity, paths, and graph colorings. Applications of these topics will be investigated and will include the development of appropriate algorithms.

MATH 3540 Introduction to Cryptography - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2460. An introduction to the mathematics of cryptology and cryptanalysis. Topics include difficulty of an algorithm in terms of polynomial time; number theory topics of divisibility, greatest common divisor, the Euclidean Algorithm, prime numbers, congruence, Fermat's little theorem, factoring, and discrete logarithms; encryption schemes and the associated matrices or linear maps; perfect security; the DES algorithm; public-key encryption; and digital signatures. The ability to read a proof is expected.
 

MATH 3550 Numerical Analysis - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2460. A course in numerical solutions to problems in mathematics: roots of non-linear equations, zeros of polynomials, interpolation, systems of linear algebraic equations, quadrature, ordinary differential equations with analysis of methods and errors, and programming of methods on a computer.

MATH 3590 Game Theory - 3 hours
Prerequisites: Grade of C or above in MATH 2040 or MATH 2450. Game theory models will be discussed from a humanities-based, decision-sciences perspective. Topics will include strategic, matrix and sequential games, optimization, Nash equilibria and strategies. Applications will include economic and strategic (military) models, the Prisoner's Dilema, Cournot Duopoly, bargaining and auctions.
 

MATH 3600 Introduction to Abstract Algebra I (W) - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2800. A formal introduction to the algebra of groups, rings, and fields.

MATH 3610 Introduction to Abstract Algebra II - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 3600. A continuation of MATH 3600. Topics include group theory, ring theory, field theory, Galois theory, and finite fields.

MATH 3650 Introduction to Linear Algebra - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2460. An introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra. Topics include finite-dimensional vector spaces, bases, linear transformations, and matrices.

MATH 4120 Elementary Differential Geometry - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2470. Topics include curves, surfaces, coordinate charts, differentiable manifolds, the tangent plane, the first fundamental form, the Gauss map, the second fundamental form, curvature, geodesics, the Gauss-Bonnet theorem, projections with applications to cartography.

MATH 4130 Introduction to Topology - 3 hours
Prerequisites: Grade of C or above in MATH 2800 and MATH 2470. An introductory course in point set topology. Topics include topological spaces, bases, subspaces, closed sets and limit points, the product topology, connected spaces, compact spaces, countability axioms, separation axioms, Urysohnís lemma, the Tychonoff theorem, and complete metric spaces.

MATH 4180 Functions of a Complex Variable - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2470. Topics include conditions for analyticity, elementary functions, the fundamental theorem of algebra, power series, residues, poles, and conformal mapping.

MATH 4200 Introduction to Real Analysis I - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2800. An introductory course in functions of a real variable, limits, continuous functions, differentiation, and Riemann integration.

MATH 4210 Introduction to Real Analysis II - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 4200. This course is a continuation of MATH 4200. Topics include numerical sequences and series, sequences and series of functions, functions of several variables, and the implicit function theorem.

MATH 4310 Theory of Numbers - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2800. A study of elementary problems in number theory with topics from divisibility, congruences, residues, special functions, Diophantine equations, and continued fractions.

MATH 4550 Computer Applications in Operations Research - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 3650 or BUSA 3110. A study of various problems and models in the field of operations research. Topics will include linear programming, the transportation problem, the assignment problem, project scheduling, network models, and queuing theory. Computer software will be available to assist students in the computational aspects of their solutions.

MATH 4700 History of Mathematics - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2450. A survey of the historical development of mathematics with emphasis on topics for secondary teachers.

MATH 4900 Independent Study - 1- 3 hours
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and the department head. Independent reading and study under the direction of a faculty member of the department covering selected topics not normally discussed in major course work. May be repeated for credit.

MATH 4910 Internship in Mathematics - 1- 3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing and approval of department head. Hands-on experience in the area of mathematics in an industrial, governmental, or education setting.

MATH 4950 Senior Project in Mathematics (W) (O) - 1 hour
Prerequisite: Senior status or approval of the department head.
This course is designed to function as a capstone course for mathematics majors. Under the direction of a full-time mathematics faculty member, the student will select a mathematical topic and conduct independent explorations. Results will be communicated to the mathematics faculty by a research paper and presentation.
 

COURSES IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

MAED 4101 Methods and Materials for Secondary Mathematics Teachers - 3 hours
Corequisite: EDUC 4000. A study and practice of techniques involved in the effective guidance and instruction of mathematics students in grades 6-12.

MAED 4201 Mathematics Education Seminar - 3 hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: MAED 4101. This capstone course focuses on assisting pre-service secondary mathematics teachers to make insightful connections between advanced mathematics courses and the high school mathematics they will be teaching while contributing to the mathematical understanding and pedagogical skills of pre-service teachers.
 

COURSES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CSCI 1100 Introduction to Computers and Information Systems - 2 hours
An introductory course in computers including an overview of computer hardware and application software. Course includes laboratory experiences with word-processing, presentation software, e-mail communications, and exploration of the internet and www resources.

CSCI 1150 Computers and Information Systems Seminar - 1 hour
Prerequisite or Corequisite CSCI 1100. This course provides an exploration of trends in computers and information systems and examines how trends influence our personal, social, and economic systems. Ethical issues regarding information and information processing will also be included as well as work with spreadsheet and database applications.

CSCI 1200 Technology and Learning - 3 hours
Credit not applicable toward a computer science major or minor. An introductory course in computers and computing for teacher education majors at all levels. The course includes an overview of current computer technology, hands-on experiences with multimedia applications for instructional delivery, exploration of distance learning and internet resources, and integration of software into the instructional process. Students not proficient in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and webpage development should take CSCI 1100 prior to enrollment in CSCI 1200.

CSCI 1301 Computer Science I - 3 hours
This course will cultivate critical thinking skills by presenting computer science as a problem solving discipline with emphasis in: fundamentals of computer science, algorithm development and analysis, and the design, coding, debugging, and documentation of structured programs. Introduction to some software engineering concepts will also be covered.

CSCI 1301L Computer Science I Lab - 1 hour
Corequisite for CS/CIS majors: CSCI 1301. This course is an applied component of CSCI 1301. Students practice the programming concepts learned in CSCI 1301 through pre designed laboratory assignments in programming.

CSCI 1302 Computer Science II - 4 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1301 and CSCI 1301L. This course is a continuation of the topics introduced in CSCI 1301. It extends the discussion of object-oriented programming to include interface, event handling, streams, recursion, and searching and sorting. This course will have a strong lab component.

CSCI 2100 Technology in Mathematics- 2 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in MATH 2450. Credit not applicable to computer science major or minor. A course to develop skills in use of technology in the teaching and learning of mathematics. Laboratory experiences include use of Maple, Mathview, Excel, the Geometerís Sketchpad, Netscape, graphing calculators, CBL equipment and other current technology appropriate for mathematics instruction at the secondary level.

CSCI 2150 Computer Ethics and Social Issues - 3 hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1302. This course introduces the student to the social impact of computers and software. Topics include professional responsibilities related to copyright, software protection, and privacy.

CSCI 2700 Object-Oriented Systems - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. In this course the students will be introduced to the concepts of Object-Oriented Programming as a means of problem solving. The topics include classes, objects, modeling techniques, inheritance, abstract data types, information hiding, polymorphism, modularity, messages, and reusability.

CSCI 3000 Web Programming - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. An introduction to various techniques in client and server-side scripting; topics include dynamic web pages, CGI, interpreted vs. compiled code, and server-side includes. The course also covers recent trends in world-wide web standards, electronic commerce applications, and web services. The course requires a substantial amount of programming.

CSCI 3050 Information Security - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. An introduction to information systems security issues; topics include threats, vulnerabilities, controls, encryption, and risk assessment. The course also covers security in programs, operating systems security, database security, security in networks, administrative security, computer crime, and threats to privacy. The course requires some programming.

CSCI 3100 Computer Organization and Architecture - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. The course covers both the organizational and architectural levels of computer systems. The topics of the course include instruction sets, addressing, microprogramming, memory, I/O, interrupts and data paths. Multicomputers, multiprocessors, pipeline computers, supercomputers, CICS and RISC architectures will also be covered.

CSCI 3200 Data Structures - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 2700. The course covers the structure of data and algorithms. Topics covered include sorting, searching, updating, hashing techniques, advanced tree structures and a more formal and in-depth treatment of the topics included in CSCI 2700. An introduction to complexity analysis of algorithms and complexity classes as well as parallel and distributed algorithms will also be covered.

CSCI 3250 Computer Security - 3 hours
Prerequisites: CSCI 2700 and CSCI 3050. This course covers several security topics pertaining to real-life systems currently deployed and commonly used in Internet computing environments. Materials covered include program security issues, database security issues, and operating systems security issues.

CSCI 3300 Systems Analysis and Design (W) - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. The course introduces techniques of analysis and design of business application systems through the use of CASE tools. Topics include Data Flow Diagrams (DFD), Data Dictionaries (DD), Entity Relationship Diagrams (ERD), structure charts, and object-oriented analysis and design tools. The course will also cover project planning and control and cost benefit analysis. A case study is required for this course.

CSCI 3350 Computer Forensics - 3 hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 3050. Topics include file types (text, image, compressed, encrypted), operating systems basics, discovery of digital evidence, computer forensics tools, network basics, network tracing, network log files, network sniffing/trapping, legal issues, case studies, computer forensics procedures.

CSCI 3400 Database Principles - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. This course covers the analysis and design techniques of relational and object-oriented databases. Topics include entity relationship modeling, semantic object modeling, database design using ERD and semantic object models, integrity constraints, normalization, structured query languages, concurrency control, and distributed database processing.

CSCI 3500 Management Information Systems - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302 and MGMT 3661. This course covers the analysis of information to support operations, management analysis, and decision-making functions in an organization. Topics include planning, control, and development of computer-based information systems in the organization; and management of the hardware, software, data, and the resources of the organization.

CSCI 3600 Computer Graphics - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 2700. The main focus of this course is to provide an introduction to interactive computer graphics. A large component of the class will consist of writing a large-scale graphics program using a high-level language. Topics include machine-independent graphics, graphics standards, a survey of applications, use of graphics libraries, output devices, appropriate data structures, and mathematical manipulation of graphical objects.

CSCI 3800 Introduction to UNIX - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade C or above in CSCI 1301. A survey of UNIX commands, file systems, shells, basic scripting, and applications. The course involves hands-on programming and laboratory exercises.

CSCI 3810 UN System Administration - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade C or above in CSCI 3800. Topics include installation, configuration, and maintenance of various operating systems. Students are required to install and configure servers from start to finish.

CSCI 3900 Selected Topics - 1- 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade C or above in CSCI 1302. Advanced topics in a special area of computer science.

CSCI 4000 New Media Design - 3 hours
Prerequisites: CSCI 1301. Includes applications of technologies to display sophisticated text, graphics, animation, and video for new media such as the Web. This course includes the design and development of a major media project and is the capstone course for the minor in new media design and communication.
 

CSCI 4100 Operating Systems and File Organization - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 3100 and CSCI 3200. This course provides an introduction to operating system concepts and file organization. Topics include processes, process coordination and synchronization, physical and virtual memory management, CPU scheduling, concurrent processes, and comparison of some operating systems. File systems and file organization are also covered.

CSCI 4200 Programming Languages - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. This course provides a comparative study of the various features of programming languages including data typing, sequence control, data structure implementation, and run time storage management. It also covers the language constructs that support distributed and parallel computing as well as application of these constructs in parallel and distributed computing.

CSCI 4300 Theory of Computation - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 4200. This course introduces the theory of computability, automata, and formal languages. Topics include regular expressions, context-free and context-sensitive grammar, Turing machines, recursive functions, lambda calculus, and formal program semantics.

CSCI 4400 Software Engineering - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 3200. This course introduces the students to the principles of software methodology and engineering. Topics include specification, design, testing, and maintenance of software systems. Documentation style, team organization, software verification and validation, and security and protection are also covered.

CSCI 4500 Data Communications - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. This course covers fundamentals of computer and data communication in some detail. Topics include data transmission protocols and architecture, guided and unguided transmission media, data encoding techniques, data communication interfaces, data link controls, multiplexing, and local area networks. It also covers the Open System Interconnection model.

CSCI 4510 Network Administration - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 4500. Topics include network configuration, integration of LANs and WANs, routers, switches, and network access servers. Special attention is paid to aspects of security, access control, and problem determination/troubleshooting.

CSCI 4600 Parallel Processing - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 4100. The course illustrates how parallelism can yield significant speed-up in comparison with sequential execution. Topics include concurrency and synchronization, architectural support, programming language constructs for parallel computing, parallel algorithms and complexity, load balancing, and scheduling. Different parallel architectures (e.g., MIMD, SIMD, and array processors) will also be included.

CSCI 4650 Network Security - 3 hours
Prerequisites: CSCI 3050 and CSCI 4500. This course covers IP security with an in-depth treatment of authentication, email security, web security, network management security, intruders, malicious software, firewalls, etc.
 

CSCI 4700 Graphical User Interface Design - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 1302. This course teaches the fundamentals of GUI (Graphical User Interface) design. Major topics include objectives of the GUI interface, the GUI design process, objects and actions, elements of an interface, and manipulating objects. The course also teaches the various components and behavior of graphical user interfaces including windows, controls, manipulation, and application flow. A hands-on practical lab is an essential component of this course.

CSCI 4750 Data Modeling - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 3400. A continuation of CSCI 3400. Topics include database languages, security systems, transaction management, query processing, distributed DBMSs, object-oriented DBMSs, Web technology, and data warehousing.

CSCI 4800 Artificial Intelligence - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 3200. The course teaches fundamentals of artificial intelligence. The topics include expert systems, natural languages, robotics, planning, speech, and vision.

CSCI 4900 Independent Study - 1- 3 hours
Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor and the department head. Independent study under the direction of a faculty member. Topics covered will include areas not regularly offered as part of the program. May be repeated for credit.

CSCI 4910 Internship in Computer Science - 1- 3 hours
Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and approval of the department head. Hands-on experience in the area of computer science through a combination of scheduled seminar discussion groups and supervised experience. May be repeated for credit.

CSCI 4950 Senior Project (W) (O) - 3 hours
Prerequisite: Grade of C or above in CSCI 3300 and senior standing. This course is designed for Computer Science majors who are within one semester of graduation. It is a capstone course integrating the analysis and skills acquired from the previous courses in computer science and the studentís area of concentration.